AASA Automotive Aftermarket Study: Market shifting away from DIY

Jan. 1, 2020
Reversing recent trends, all types of do-it-yourself (DIY) activity decreased in 2010, according to a new study from the Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association (AASA). A detailed analysis, based on research from IMR Inc., of the DIY market is i
Reversing recent trends, all types of do-it-yourself (DIY) activity decreased in 2010, according to a new study from the Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association (AASA). A detailed analysis, based on research from IMR Inc., of the DIY market is included in the 2012 AASA Automotive Aftermarket Status Report.

“After a spike in DIY maintenance during the most recent economic downturn, the market is shifting back to DIFM growth,” said Paul McCarthy, AASA vice president of industry analysis, planning and member services. “The increase in DIFM activity is a response to a gradual economic recovery, as well as consumers becoming increasingly willing to put money into keeping aging vehicles on the road.” Based on consumer surveys of vehicle maintainers conducted by IMR Inc., AASA grouped service jobs into easy, moderate or difficult DIY categories.

Examples of easy DIY include replacing car batteries, adding antifreeze and installing a new air filter. Jobs in the moderate DIY category are more involved and include installing items such as brake shoes and pads. Jobs in the difficult DIY category require the most knowledge and level of expertise and include replacing fuel injectors or water pumps. The data reveals that in 2010 48.5 percent of easy category work was performed by vehicle maintainers, compared to 52.6 percent in 2009. Moderately complex tasks saw a decrease in DIY market share to 26.7 percent in 2010 from 30.0 percent in 2009 and DIY’s share of more difficult repairs fell to 19.2 percent in 2010 from 21.4 percent in 2009.

“As illustrated in following chart ‘DIY Share by Difficulty of Repair,’ the trend line over time shows a clear decline in all types of DIY,” said McCarthy. “The move toward ever more complex and technically sophisticated vehicles has led to a long-term shift in favor of the do-it-for-me (DIFM) market.”

The AASA Automotive Aftermarket Status Report provides 15 chapters of key aftermarket industry data, including: Latest figures on unperformed maintenance Aftermarket size and growth

  • Size and growth of key subsectors:
    • Maintenance
    • Engine
    • Undercar
    • Cooling / A/C
  • Vehicle population and usage Outlet Channel market share

  • DIY market share trends
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