A scan tool matrix

Jan. 1, 2020
It is not generally a part of my column to ask for your help, but in this situation I hope it is appropriate.

It is not generally a part of my column to ask for your help, but in this situation I hope it is appropriate. In addition to the other opportunities I have to serve the auto repair industry, I serve on the National Automotive Service Task Force (NASTF) on the service information and tool and equipment committee. If you have not heard of NASTF, or have but really don’t know who we are or what we do, don’t feel left out. We tend to be one of the best-kept non-secrets in the industry. NASTF has a simple mission, but a very difficult job:
 
“The National Automotive Service Task Force will facilitate the identification and correction of gaps in the availability and accessibility of automotive service information, training, diagnostic tools and equipment, and communications to automotive service professionals.”
 
We have folks from independent repair shops, dealers, aftermarket toolmakers, trade associations, parts manufacturers and auto makers all serving on this volunteer project. If you visit our website, you will find considerable resources created by various committees for use by all in the industry — absolutely free of charge.

One of the tasks that I have taken on as the co-chair of the tool and equipment committee is the creation of a scan tool feature matrix for end users. Our goal is to create for each manufacturer a list of the operations or features that each tool performs, along with the following information:
Information for ordering
Required update method
Licensing fees, if any
Tasks requiring SDRM access
Whether a PC-based or stand alone platform
If PC-based, what are the operating system requirements
Ability to perform flash programming, or is an additional interface needed
Year/model compatibility
Any companion devices available/needed
Integration with OE service information site available/cost
Items available on the dealer version that are not available to the aftermarket

PAGE 2

We are initially focusing on the OE tools as they would be the benchmark to determine which functions are needed in your facility. This was agreed upon during a conference call with people from all parts of the industry. The rapid and constant change in the aftermarket scan tool world led us to sideline a matrix project for them at this time, but that doesn’t mean the end result will not benefit aftermarket scan tool companies.
 
Shop owners will be able to take this information and make smart decisions about which tools to purchase for their shop. Since many of you market or even train on these tools, it would be helpful if you were involved in the process. If you have particular experience with any factory scan tool and you would like to help with the creation of the matrix for the tool,  please contact me at [email protected].

It is not generally a part of my column to ask for your help, but in this situation I hope it is appropriate. In addition to the other opportunities I have to serve the auto repair industry, I serve on the National Automotive Service Task Force (NASTF) on the service information and tool and equipment committee. If you have not heard of NASTF, or have but really don’t know who we are or what we do, don’t feel left out. We tend to be one of the best-kept non-secrets in the industry. NASTF has a simple mission, but a very difficult job:
 
“The National Automotive Service Task Force will facilitate the identification and correction of gaps in the availability and accessibility of automotive service information, training, diagnostic tools and equipment, and communications to automotive service professionals.”
 
We have folks from independent repair shops, dealers, aftermarket toolmakers, trade associations, parts manufacturers and auto makers all serving on this volunteer project. If you visit our website, you will find considerable resources created by various committees for use by all in the industry — absolutely free of charge.

One of the tasks that I have taken on as the co-chair of the tool and equipment committee is the creation of a scan tool feature matrix for end users. Our goal is to create for each manufacturer a list of the operations or features that each tool performs, along with the following information:
Information for ordering
Required update method
Licensing fees, if any
Tasks requiring SDRM access
Whether a PC-based or stand alone platform
If PC-based, what are the operating system requirements
Ability to perform flash programming, or is an additional interface needed
Year/model compatibility
Any companion devices available/needed
Integration with OE service information site available/cost
Items available on the dealer version that are not available to the aftermarket

PAGE 2

We are initially focusing on the OE tools as they would be the benchmark to determine which functions are needed in your facility. This was agreed upon during a conference call with people from all parts of the industry. The rapid and constant change in the aftermarket scan tool world led us to sideline a matrix project for them at this time, but that doesn’t mean the end result will not benefit aftermarket scan tool companies.
 
Shop owners will be able to take this information and make smart decisions about which tools to purchase for their shop. Since many of you market or even train on these tools, it would be helpful if you were involved in the process. If you have particular experience with any factory scan tool and you would like to help with the creation of the matrix for the tool,  please contact me at [email protected].