Profiting from using service information

Jan. 1, 2020
You go to training and learn the ways to track down service information. But what happens when you get back to the shop? As shop owner Donny Seyfer says, usually the training is just not utilized.

You go to training and learn the ways to track down service information. But what happens when you get back to the shop? As shop owner Donny Seyfer says, usually the training is just not utilized.

“They’re still having these issues where they’re saying, “Well, I don’t know where to find this,’” Seyfer explains. “And I come back and say, “Well, did you check on the OE website? Or did you try this source or did you try that source?’”

But CARS attendees who took advantage of Sunday’s course “Realize the Profits of Service Information Utilization” now have a plan in place to track down and really use the service information they find.

During Sunday’s training, Seyfer walked owners and technicians through their diagnostic process and how to adjust it so that gathering diagnostic information is on the forefront of work in the bays.

“(We) want to reduce your cycle time by using information more effectively, looking at the value proposition of if you sit there for 30 minutes thinking about it as opposed to putting this stuff in front of you where it needs to be, you’re losing money,” Seyfer says.

Attendees took the information and tips from Seyfer and were given the start of a diagnostic approach they can now tailor to their individual shop’s needs.

 

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In addition to the shop plan, Seyfer shared information on setting up computers for technicians (and making sure rules are in place so they can get the information they need to fix cars, not fix their fantasy football teams) and how to choose scan tools. Both of these issues are key in implementing the good shop diagnostic plan.

To choose the right scan tool, Seyfer talked about creating a log sheet containing details of service and information needed so owners can make sure the right tool is purchased for the shop. This comes in handy now that diagnostic tools and service information are rapidly changing and integrating.

“This is a kind of a return on investment, ROI, way of looking at the tool, logging repairs,” Seyfer explains. “Saying, I’m working on this kind of car quite a bit, but to actually say, I could’ve fixed this car had I had this tool in, that’s more valuable.”

While Seyfer shared some specific sites and tools to check out for diagnostic information, he stresses that vehicles serviced do affect the needs of a shop. By actually utilizing the diagnostic plans and log sheets created Sunday, he says shops can improve their diagnostic skills. And that, in the end, can lead to better bottom lines.

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