Goodyear: Mounting aircraft customers' tires calls for special steps

Jan. 1, 2020
According to aviation tire expert Larry Rapsard, a product support manager at Goodyear, correctly mounting these types of tires requires following the detailed mounting procedures provided by tire and wheel manufacturers for both tube-type and tubele
Taking time to stretch and add a dose of talcum powder may sound like a gymnast getting ready for the high bar or Lebron James preparing to hit the basketball court, but these practices also apply to mounting aircraft tires if you have customers who are pilots.

According to aviation tire expert Larry Rapsard, a product support manager at Goodyear, correctly mounting these types of tires requires following the detailed mounting procedures provided by tire and wheel manufacturers for both tube-type and tubeless tires.

Rapsard says the procedure calls for a 12-hour stretch after the initial mounting.

“All tires – particularly bias tires – will stretch after the initial inflation, causing a volume increase and a corresponding drop in pressure,” he reports. “For that reason, tires should not be placed in service until they’ve been inflated for a minimum of 12 hours and reinflated if necessary.”

After the 12-hour stretch period, it is highly recommended that the tire/wheel assembly be given a 24-hour diffusion check to make sure the assembly is holding inflation properly. Tubeless assemblies, in particular, can lose pressure through the valve, o-ring, fuse plug, overpressure plug, tiny cracks in the wheel, etc, says Rapsard.

 

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When mounting a tube-type tire, a light coat of talc on the tube before mounting will help the tube fit inside the tire. After mounting, first inflate, then deflate, then re-inflate the tire. This helps to equalize the tube inside the tire, minimizing the chance for pinching and folding.

When mounting a tubeless tire, torque the wheel bolts properly and inflate the tire to the recommended inflation pressure with dry nitrogen, he advises.

After mounting aircraft tires, check tire pressures daily when they are at ambient temperature, because tire/wheel assemblies can lose as much as 5 percent of inflation pressure in 24 hours. “By observing these procedures for mounting aircraft tires, you’ll experience better results from your tires,” Rapsard points out.

For additional mounting details and more information, visit www.goodyearaviation.com.

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